OSWA Annual Meeting 2019

Save the Date

Oregon Small Woodlands Association

2019 Annual Meeting in Corvallis

Hosted by the Benton County Chapter

June 20th – 22nd

Plans will include:

  • Discounted lodging at Corvallis Courtyard Marriott –

Thursday, June 20th –

  • Afternoon mill and area tours
  • OTFS and OSWA Board meetings at Courtyard Marriott

Friday, June 21st at Benton County Fair Grounds 

  • Full day of presentations, exhibits, and programs
  • OSWA Membership Meeting
  • Silent Auction
  • Awards banquet

Saturday, June 22nd -Carr/Oaks –

  • 2018 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year woods tour

Details in upcoming OSWA Newsletters & Annual Meeting brochure mailed in early May

June 20, 2019 - June 22, 2019

OSWA Lincoln Co Chapter Annual Tree Seedling Sale

Contact person: Joe Steere

Email:  jsteere@miami-corp.com

Native tree seedlings and some native shrub species will be available. This annual event is designed to provide the public with affordable native tree seedlings, promote natural resource conservation awareness, and to increase forest owners’ knowledge and abilities as stewards of their land. (A few nonnatives also).

Most seedlings will be $2.

Date: February 23, 2019

Time: 10:00am to 3:00pm

Location: Lincoln County Fairgrounds 4-H Building, Newport OR 97365

 

Gaebel Neighbor to Neighbor Tree Farm Tour

By Jeremy Felty

On July 21st, 115 participants arrived at the Gaebel Tree Farm in North Plains for a Neighbor to Neighbor Woods Tour. In 2017, the Gaebel’s were the Washington County Tree Farmers of the Year. The tour was sponsored by the Gaebels and the Washington County Small Woodlands Chapter. It was funded by a grant to OSWA from Oregon Forest Resource Institute. The topics covered at the tour included, an overview of pond maintenance, food plots, portable sawmilling by family friend Clint Michael; the topic of commercial thinning was covered by Steve Cafferata; road design and culvert installation was covered by local ODF stewardship forester Nate Agalzoff and Tualatin Watershed Council representative, April Olbrich; and Big Horn Logging’s, Mark Stanley covered the active logging on the property.

Connie and Rich Gaebel discusses the family and property history.
Connie and Rich Gaebel discusses the family and property history.

In 1979, Rich and Connie Gaebel purchased this property as a rural place to live, a get-a-way and a place to hunt. It is the southern 40 acres of an original 160-acre parcel. Access required building a 60-foot clear span bridge. The 160 acres had been logged at the turn of the century and again in the 1950’s but never replanted. It was mostly brush, hardwoods and scattered young conifers. It was also used as a horse trail riding area with access to the coast range. Old logging skid trails abound and evidence of an old rail road grade running parallel to the creek was also evident. There is an old saw mill location close to the old rail road grade.

By 1981, Rich with help from friends and family built a road, bridge, cleared and planted 3 acres. By 1985 they had cleared and planted an additional 14 acres. Rich and Connie tried raising cattle and Christmas trees. In 1994 they converted the Christmas trees to forestry. Rich installed culverts where the road crossed three small creeks. One was recently replaced with a 36” fish passage culvert.

ODF Stewardship Forester Nate Agalzoff and April Olbrich discuss the culverts on the road system
ODF Stewardship Forester Nate Agalzoff and April Olbrich discuss the culverts on the road system

In the late 90’s, they installed a wildlife pond with water right’s and wildlife food plots primarily for deer, elk occasionally visit the site. In 2003, he logged and cleared three small areas, totaling 1.6 acres, and planted Cedar trees in groves. They were thinning in 2016 and are now thriving. Rich and Connie became very active in the Washington County Small Woodlands chapter in 1980.

Family friend Clint Michael explains the irrigation system, pond, and specialized dam system
Family friend Clint Michael explains the irrigation system, pond, and specialized dam system
The tour concluded with a catered lunch
The tour concluded with a catered lunch

Cafferata Family Outstanding Tree Famers of the Year Woods Tour

By Jeremy Felty

On June 30th in conjunction with OSWA’s Annual Meeting, 150 participants visited the 79-acre Cafferata Family Forest located in Lane County, hosted by the Cafferata family, OSWA’s Lane County Chapter, and Oregon Tree Farm System. It was funded by a grant to OSWA from Oregon Forest Resource Institute. Steve and Wylda Cafferata have owned this property since 2009. The tour focused on topics that the Cafferatas deal with on a daily basis, including thinning on the property, the presence of wildlife on the property, the controlling of unwanted vegetation, various reforestation strategies, and the importance of keeping the family involved.

Dick Courter, OTFS Awards Chairman, presents the 2017 Oregon Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year plaque to Steve and Wylda
Dick Courter, OTFS Awards Chairman, presents the 2017 Oregon Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year plaque to Steve and Wylda

The Cafferatas have a deep back ground in forestry. In 2009, Steve and Wylda, after raising four children and working for 35 years in their professions, realized one of their dreams by purchasing 79 acres of forestland. The land had been logged, replanted haphazardly, and then neglected for decades, so they set to work to bring the land under management. Using their skills, the Cafferatas put together an exemplary forest management plan that was certified to the American Tree Farm System in 2010. The results are great attention to wood, water, recreation, and wildlife and all the other attributes found in a working forest. The entire family, including the third generation, is involved in the management and enjoyment of the property.

Mike Cafferata discusses thinning projects conducted on the property
Mike Cafferata discusses thinning projects conducted on the property

Every speaker on the woods tour was a member of the family, the goal for the tour was to discuss the topics provided by the certification guidelines provided by the American Tree Farm System. Mike Cafferata spoke about thinning and vegetation management; Fran Cafferata Coe spoke about wildlife on the property; Joe Cafferata spoke about road maintenance and maintaining water quality; Wylda Cafferata spoke about aesthetics, fire protection, and security and access; Steve Cafferata spoke about soils, brush field rehabilitation, and planting; and Sam Cafferata spoke about recreation on their property.

A large crowd gathered for lunch, consisting of OSWA members, fellow tree farmers, guests from the World Forestry Center, and friends and family
A large crowd gathered for lunch, consisting of OSWA members, fellow tree farmers, guests
from the World Forestry Center, and friends and family

Woodland Measurements Workshop

Presented by Benton County Small Woodlands Association

Dave Hibbs Cedar Spring Tree Farm

Date: Saturday, October 20, 2018
Time: 8:30 carpool for a 9:00 start. Will be done at noon.

Location: S. Polk County. Details provided upon registration.
RSVP: 541-766-6750 by 10 a.m. Wednesday 10/17/18. Space is limited.

Knowing something about what you have in the woods is important. If you are selling trees, you will want to know the volume in the stands to be harvested. If you are thinking about stand density and thinning, you will want to know how crowded your stands are. Join Dave Hibbs for a hands-on field class that will look at ways to collect and analyze both density and volume data. Sponsored by Benton County Small Woodlands and OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension. We will be in the woods most of the time, so please dress accordingly.

Carr/Oaks/Johnson Neighbor to Neighbor Woods Tour

By Jeremy Felty

On May 19th 2018, 160 participants visited the Carr-Oakes-Johnson Homestead/Hardell Tree Farm in Benton county. They are the 2018 Benton County Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year. The property is in its 4th generation of continuous family management. The first piece was homesteaded in 1883. Some of the original family orchard is still there and being managed to preserve its varieties. As new pieces of land were added and times changed in Oregon, management has shifted from agriculture to forestry with the family planting tens of thousands of tree seedlings long before that was a common practice.

Today, the property is a vigorous forest, bits and pieces of diversity that are being preserved or added, and 3 generations of family working together to keep the forest productive and to bring the family together. The first goal they list for the property is to have the 5th generation out there working and playing too.
The tour was hosted by the Carr/Oakes family, OSWA’s Benton County Chapter, and OSU Forestry Extension. It was funded by a grant to OSWA from Oregon Forest Resource Institute. Topics covered at the tour were, Pre-commercial thinning and commercial thinning strategies, the development of a pond and wildlife in a managed forest, and planning for a balanced forest age distribution.

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Dan Carr explains how he performs a pre-commercial thinning
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Brad Withrow-Robinson describes a precommercial thinning processes
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Fran Cafferata Coe and Kayla Carr discuss development of forest ponds while participants view rare red legged frogs.
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Mike Cloughesy discusses commercial thinning strategy options.